Arran Quay, Dublin, Éire

Arran Quay, Dublin, Éire

Dublin is a city whose architecture I am only now beginning to appreciate, and the same may be said for other Irish people as well. The city shares something in common with Bath and Edinburgh in that its main architectural heritage dates from the eighteenth century. However, the rise of Irish nationalism and the decline in the city's economic fortunes following the Act of Union in 1800 have resulted in the loss of a substantial amount of its eighteenth century character, a fate that never befell Edinburgh in spite of its Act of Union in 1707. Let's hope that its residents now realise what they have and will, in their new-found prosperity, maintain what is left of the old for future generations.

The view above is of buildings on the north bank of the river Liffey, Dublin's main river and boundary between its Northside and its Southside. It is viewed from the south bank, between St. James' Gate Brewery (Guinness) in the west and Christ Church Cathedral in the east. One landmark that pokes its head in at the back of the picture is the Four Courts and we will get a closer view of it next.

See more photos from: City of Dublin, Éire